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Top Story

Three MSU students honored with Michigan Farm Bureau scholarships

February 19, 2019

Three exemplary Michigan State University (MSU) students were honored Saturday, Feb.16, at Michigan Farm Bureau’s (MFB) Growing Together Conference in Grand Rapids.

Amanda Forraht of Berrien County, Elizabeth Ritchie of Van Buren County and Samantha Wagner of Jackson County were recipients of the MFB Marge Karker Scholarship.

Each received a $1,000 award to help fund her MSU education.

Amanda Forraht

Amanda is majoring in animal science in MSU’s College of Agriculture and Natural Resources (CANR). Raised on her family’s farm, she learned the value of caring for animals and the land influencing her decision to pursue a career in the equine industry. Upon graduation, Amanda hopes to work in equine physical therapy or rehabilitation to keep performance horses in top condition for their sport.

At MSU, Amanda participates in the Rodeo Club and Dairy Evaluation Judging Team. Outside of the university, she’s been involved in the Ranch Horse Association of Michigan, Mid-America Cowgirls Rodeo Drill Team and 4-H.

Amanda is the daughter of Douglas and Suzanne Forraht of Sodus.

Elizabeth Ritchie

Elizabeth is a second-year student in MSU’s College of Veterinary Medicine. After helping nurse an ill calf back to health as a child, Elizabeth developed a passion for the health and welfare of livestock. Through internships during her vet school tenure, she’s found a niche in veterinary pharmaceutical development. Whether working in private practice or for a veterinary pharmaceutical company, Elizabeth hopes to use her advanced degree to further improve the health of livestock.

Elizabeth holds a Bachelor of Science degree from Grand Valley State University. She is actively involved in many student organizations within the College of Veterinary Medicine, including serving as the secretary of the Food Animal Club. Elizabeth credits 4-H for her exposure to multiple livestock species.

Elizabeth is the daughter of Tim and Stacy Ritchie of Decatur.

Samantha Wagner

Samantha is a senior majoring in Agriculture, Food and Natural Resources Education in MSU’s CANR. As a member of the Springport FFA Chapter, Samantha gained exposure to agricultural education in high school influencing her decision to pursue a career as an agricultural educator. At MSU, Samantha has been a Glassen Scholar working on behalf of MSU with the Department of Natural Resources’ Legislative and Legal Affairs Office.

Samantha is an active member of student organizations on campus including the Sigma Alpha Sorority, Block and Bridle, and Agriculture Future of America.

She is the daughter of Dale and Lou Wagner of Springport.

Michigan Farm Bureau’s Marge Karker Scholarship was established in the 1960s to honor the former coordinator of Farm Bureau women’s programs which included activities involving citizenship, health, education, legislation, public relations, safety and community projects. Through her tenure from 1922-1964, Marge Karker helped to lay the foundation for the current Promotion and Education and Young Farmer programming. The scholarship is open to any MSU student of sophomore standing or higher who is studying in the CANR, College of Veterinary Medicine or Institute of Agricultural Technology.

The next round of applications will be due Oct. 1, 2019.

 

MSU Students

County News

Three MSU students honored with Michigan Farm Bureau scholarships

February 19, 2019

Three exemplary Michigan State University (MSU) students were honored Saturday, Feb.16, at Michigan Farm Bureau’s (MFB) Growing Together Conference in Grand Rapids.

Amanda Forraht of Berrien County, Elizabeth Ritchie of Van Buren County and Samantha Wagner of Jackson County were recipients of the MFB Marge Karker Scholarship.

Each received a $1,000 award to help fund her MSU education.

Amanda Forraht

Amanda is majoring in animal science in MSU’s College of Agriculture and Natural Resources (CANR). Raised on her family’s farm, she learned the value of caring for animals and the land influencing her decision to pursue a career in the equine industry. Upon graduation, Amanda hopes to work in equine physical therapy or rehabilitation to keep performance horses in top condition for their sport.

At MSU, Amanda participates in the Rodeo Club and Dairy Evaluation Judging Team. Outside of the university, she’s been involved in the Ranch Horse Association of Michigan, Mid-America Cowgirls Rodeo Drill Team and 4-H.

Amanda is the daughter of Douglas and Suzanne Forraht of Sodus.

Elizabeth Ritchie

Elizabeth is a second-year student in MSU’s College of Veterinary Medicine. After helping nurse an ill calf back to health as a child, Elizabeth developed a passion for the health and welfare of livestock. Through internships during her vet school tenure, she’s found a niche in veterinary pharmaceutical development. Whether working in private practice or for a veterinary pharmaceutical company, Elizabeth hopes to use her advanced degree to further improve the health of livestock.

Elizabeth holds a Bachelor of Science degree from Grand Valley State University. She is actively involved in many student organizations within the College of Veterinary Medicine, including serving as the secretary of the Food Animal Club. Elizabeth credits 4-H for her exposure to multiple livestock species.

Elizabeth is the daughter of Tim and Stacy Ritchie of Decatur.

Samantha Wagner

Samantha is a senior majoring in Agriculture, Food and Natural Resources Education in MSU’s CANR. As a member of the Springport FFA Chapter, Samantha gained exposure to agricultural education in high school influencing her decision to pursue a career as an agricultural educator. At MSU, Samantha has been a Glassen Scholar working on behalf of MSU with the Department of Natural Resources’ Legislative and Legal Affairs Office.

Samantha is an active member of student organizations on campus including the Sigma Alpha Sorority, Block and Bridle, and Agriculture Future of America.

She is the daughter of Dale and Lou Wagner of Springport.

Michigan Farm Bureau’s Marge Karker Scholarship was established in the 1960s to honor the former coordinator of Farm Bureau women’s programs which included activities involving citizenship, health, education, legislation, public relations, safety and community projects. Through her tenure from 1922-1964, Marge Karker helped to lay the foundation for the current Promotion and Education and Young Farmer programming. The scholarship is open to any MSU student of sophomore standing or higher who is studying in the CANR, College of Veterinary Medicine or Institute of Agricultural Technology.

The next round of applications will be due Oct. 1, 2019.

 

MSU Students

Legislators to hear from members at Lansing Legislative Seminar

February 19, 2019

Members attending this year’s Michigan Farm Bureau (MFB) Lansing Legislative Seminar on Feb. 26 will help celebrate the organization’s centennial anniversary, reflecting on 100 years of grass-roots policy implementation and growth of the agriculture sector through legislative and regulatory initiatives. At the same time, nearly 400 attendees will hear from a variety of speakers, setting the tone for the year as MFB acclimates and builds relationships with the Whitmer administration and new leaders in the Legislature and regulatory agencies.  

“We’re fortunate to welcome to the event Michigan Department of Agriculture and Rural Development Deputy Director Dr. James Averill, Department of Natural Resources Director Dan Eichinger and Department of Environmental Quality Deputy Director Aaron Keatley,” said MFB Communications Specialist Nicole Sevrey, the event’s coordinator. “Through a town hall-style format, the panel of three will field questions from the audience — not only will the discussion help members learn more about the departments’ respective priorities, but also help the department leaders understand our members’ expectations and areas of potential growth or concern.”

The program will also recognize Ogemaw County Farm Bureau will receive the with the Excellence in Grass-roots Lobbying Award for their efforts to protect the integrity of the Right to Farm (RTF) Act. In 2018, the Edwards Township Planning Commission attempted to thwart a livestock operation from expansion.

“Ogemaw County Farm Bureau President Brent Illig, who is also a trustee on the commission, recruited  70 farmers to attend the commission meeting in support of the Right to Farm,” said MFB Government Relations Specialist Matt Kapp. “As a result of the local Farm Bureau’s work, the commission unanimously defeated the proposal.”

Guests will also hear from Silver Plow Award recipients including former Sen. Tom Casperson, Sen. Dan Lauwers and Rep. Aaron Miller. The trio played a critical role in three initiatives impacting all aspects of Michigan agriculture: creating three Department of Environmental Quality oversight boards; amendments to agriculture’s sales and use tax exemptions; and improvements to the state’s large-quantity water-withdrawal program. The Silver Plow is MFB’s top recognition for a member of the Legislature or Congress, signifying farmers’ appreciation for leadership and support consistent with the organization’s member-developed policy.

Before ending their day at the legislative reception where they’ll visit with state representatives, senators and numerous other government officials, members can participate in four educational sessions: 

  • Farming as a Good Neighbor – Presenters will discuss the Right to Farm Act and its application of science to protect farmers from nuisance claims. Attendees will also hear about the agriculture sector’s focus on water quality by utilizing proactive, voluntary conservation programs. 
  • State Funding Priorities and Economic Outlook – In this session members will gain an understanding of economic forecasts in relation to the state agriculture department and research funding priorities within MSU.
  • Infrastructure: Roads, Bridges, Energy, Broadband and Beyond – Attendees will receive an overview of the current state of Michigan’s infrastructure and potential new policy initiatives. 
  • Legislators Are Consumers Too – This session will provide attendees with information and resources to build and nurture relationships with new legislators by listening, asking questions, identifying common values, and discussing and relating with them on issues.

 

State News

Michigan Farm Bureau
Jeremy Winsor was MFB's 2019 Educator of the Year.

Nominations for MFB’s 2020 Educator of the Year Award are due no later than Feb. 15.

Suitable nominees include any educator in your county who does an outstanding job incorporating agriculture into their curriculum and strengthening relationships between educators and your county Farm Bureau.

Both agriscience and/or K-12 educators are eligible. Qualified nominees should use innovative teaching techniques to increase their students’ understanding of agriculture.

The winner will be honored at MFB’s 2020 Annual Meeting and will receive a grant for classroom supplies and a scholarship to attend the National Agriculture in the Classroom Conference, June 24-26 in Salt Lake City, Utah.

Nominations must be completed online by Feb. 15.

For more information, contact Amelia Miller, 517-679-5688.

Nominations for MFB’s 2020 Educator of the Year Award are due no later than Feb. 15.
Jeremy C. Nagel



Top photo: Kathleen Slater-Hirsch at MFB's 2018 Annual Meeting
Middle photo: Her family's name was part of the Holton Township landscape long before Kathy Slater grew up there, the eldest of five daughters on her parent's Muskegon County dairy farm.
Bottom photo: Kathleen Slater-Hirsch and her son Bill flanked by Lisa Fedewa and Tom Nugent representing the MFB Family of Companies 

Even the most senior Farm Bureau veterans don’t likely remember a time when the state annual meeting didn’t smell like a movie theatre lobby from start to finish. That’s because Kent County Farm Bureau member Kathy Slater-Hirsch has been popping corn at the event for the past four decades.

How she got to become a fixture at the largest annual gathering of Michigan farmers is a story any of those farmers will appreciate, as it embodies the same kind of grit and determination characteristic of those who make their living from the land.

Kathy Slater grew up the eldest of five daughters on a dairy farm in northeastern Muskegon County, near Holton.

“My dad was a lifetime Farm Bureau member — he loved it — his brothers did, too. A lot of them were farmers,” Kathy said between popcorn rushes at MFB’s 2018 Annual Meeting. “He was quite the inventor and did a lot of things first in Michigan. He was the first to have a pipeline milker, bulk tank… He had all sorts of equipment to help him work because he only had girls — no boys!”

Both her parents in those early years embodied the kind of social hospitality Kathy would, later in life, bring full-circle back to the greater Farm Bureau family.

“I remember when they were first married, my mom would have a luncheon in the house and the members would come from all around,” she remembers, describing the rituals that endure to this day among Farm Bureau Community Groups.

“Dad would get everything all spiffy in the barn for the neighbors,” she said. “It was a social event — a good, social gathering of the neighborhood.”

Kathy would eventually leave the farm, graduate from accounting school, and move to Kansas City where she worked for Gulf Oil through the 1970s. She and her husband eventually returned to Michigan to start their family in Grand Rapids.

In more ways than one, their son Bill Hirsch would go on to complete the story.

By the mid-1980s, the same high interest rates and inflation that was putting so many farms into bankruptcy had the Hirsch family in a similar bind.

“And my father just walked away,” Bill remembers. “He left my mom and us — a 13-year-old daughter and a 15-year-old son — under a mountain of debt.”

There were multiple mortgages, massive credit card debt and leins on auto loans. But even under those most dire of circumstances, the dairyman’s daughter from Holton rolled up her sleeves and got to work.

Besides the family and financial disaster her husband left behind, he also walked away from the popcorn wagon they’d bought from a relative a decade earlier — a 1926 Cretors originally designed to be drawn by horses. The antique went straight into storage as a sacred family heirloom, but in the economy of the mid-‘80s, it was forced back into service.

“It needed to help pay for itself,” Bill remembers.

Its first outing was at an antique market in Allegan, a few years before Kathy took on the annual Farm Bureau gig. In addition to popcorning full-tilt at events across multiple states, she had also begun a jewelry business, a carpet-cleaning business and was managing rental units across Grand Rapids.

“My mom can be very, um, strong-willed,” Bill said. “For the war she fought on her own and got through, I love her dearly and I’m just amazed at what she’s accomplished and achieved in her life.

“She never filed for bankruptcy. She never lost the house.

“In my eyes she’s always been very successful, and she did not want to quit or retire ever. She’s said to me countless times, ‘Retiring’s not in my vocabulary.’ She didn’t want to give up.”

But Parkinson’s Disease is also strong-willed, eroding the links between brain and body until Kathy was forced at last onto the sidelines.

MFB’s 2019 Annual Meeting was her last.

In another full-circle twist, Bill is downsizing his own dairy operation to make room for the popcorn wagon that’s been part of his family’s identity since the ‘70s.

“Now I feel like this is a family legacy and it needs to continue. People love it.”

The Allegan antique market is still on the agenda, as is the Farm Bureau annual meeting, but this year it’ll be Bill filling the bags in his mother’s place.

For 40 years of making Michigan Farm Bureau’s annual meeting crunchier, saltier and more buttery than it otherwise would be, Kathy Slater-Hirsch was recently honored with a token of the organization’s appreciation. Earlier this month MFB Human Resources Director Tom Nugent and Lisa Fedewa, Engagement Specialist for Farm Bureau Insurance, delivered flowers, a plaque and other tokens of appreciation to the beloved “Popcorn Lady.”

“She loved the recognition,” Bill said. “She’s an outstanding lady.

“She took care of me now it’s my turn to take care of her.”

From a Muskegon County dairy farm through life’s most daunting crises, the “Popcorn Lady” of MFB’s annual meeting passes her legacy onto the next generation.
Michigan Farm Bureau
Kalamazoo County FB members enjoy a good rapport with U.S. Dist. 5 Congressman Fred Upton, who regularly attends Farm Bureau gatherings to exchange information on ag-related issues.

Close and regular contact with regulators and elected officials is the not-so-secret approach the Kalamazoo County Farm Bureau uses to maintain its high profile among decision-makers. Whether it’s a state agriculture commissioner or a member of the U.S. House of Representatives, no public official is beyond approaching from engaged Kalamazoo members advocating on behalf of their neighbors and farmers statewide.

For its full-court press approach to addressing issues and keeping officials aware of Farm Bureau’s stances on them, the Kalamazoo County Farm Bureau has earned MFB’s 2020 Excellence in Grassroots Lobbying Award.

One longstanding issue that really got Kalamazoo members motivated to take action was the matter of removing zoning conformance from the site-selection GAAMPs (generally accepted agricultural management practices.)

“This idea began here nearly five years ago, when a local township changed its zoning and made agriculture practically illegal — all to stop livestock facilities from being built within a prime farming area,” recalls Kelly Leach, president of the Kalamazoo County Farm Bureau.

Ever since, Kalamazoo members have worked relentlessly to be a continual presence at township board and planning commission meetings, fine-tuning policy addressing the issue and lobbying officials to protect agriculture.

“Through this issue we were even able to engage several un-involved members and spark their interest in strengthening the grassroots power of our organization,” Leach said. “This is a perfect example of the importance and effectiveness of strong grassroots lobbying to solve a problem detrimental to our industry.”

Kalamazoo’s regular schedule is a study in public affairs engagement. Upwards of a dozen elected officials or staffers attend the county’s annual policy development meeting, where they get a front-row seat on local issues affecting local farmers.

That theme continues at the county annual, regularly attended by U.S. Dist. 6 Representative Fred Upton and the region’s state reps and senators.

“We host these events each year to engage and involve our local, state and national officials and allow them to interact with our members,” Leach said.

Congressman Upton himself was the focus of a special roundtable last summer regarding the effects of adverse weather on the region’s farms.

“After touring several fields, Congressman Upton spoke with several farmer members from around the county to discuss policy issues impacting them,” Leach said. “Almost a dozen of our members met with him, his staff and several members of the media.”

Kalamazoo last year also co-hosted a farm tour for elected officials, working with the local Conservation District. Stops included a commercial greenhouse, a fruit and vegetable agritourism operation, a large commercial grain operation and a dairy farm.

“We filled a commercial-size bus with 12 elected officials, 15 of our farmer members and 10 staffers who either rode the bus or attended one of the tour stops,” Leach said.

Officials know they’re welcome at Kalamazoo’s monthly board meetings to hear about issues, share how they'll address them and forge stronger bonds with local farmers.

Kalamazoo members take full advantage of resources for maintaining open lines of communication with the officials who represent them in government and the regulatory staff whose decisions affect farmers’ livelihoods.

For urgent issues, every Farm Bureau member knows there’s no substitute for personal, face-to-face interaction. That’s how Kalamazoo members faced last summer’s challenges to the site-selection GAAMPs.

“Several of our members lobbied specific ag commissioners on the need to remove zoning conformance from the site-selection GAAMPs,” Leach said. “There was also a group of our members who traveled to personally attend and testify on this issue at several ag commission meetings over the past few years.”

Kalamazoo members with particularly close relations to officials are comfortable calling them directly on the phone. Others have made full use of MFB’s new ‘Farm Feed’ texting service to make their voices heard on issues including the Clean Water Rule, USDA emergency provisions, low-interest loans and glyphosate regulation.

The award will be presented at the annual Lansing Legislative Seminar, Feb. 25 at the Lansing Center. For its efforts Kalamazoo County Farm Bureau receives a $500 grant for use toward future grassroots lobbying activities.

 

For its full-court press approach to addressing issues and keeping officials aware of Farm Bureau’s stances on them, the Kalamazoo County Farm Bureau has earned MFB’s 2020 Excellence in Grassroots Lobbying Award.

Coming Events

DateEvents
February2020
Friday
21
2020 Young Farmer Leaders Conference
100 Grand Traverse Village Blvd
Acme,
The Michigan Farm Bureau Young Farmer Leaders Conference is for young members between the ages of 18 and 35. This two-and-a-half-day conference unites 350 young agriculture leaders and industry experts, centers on these members’ professional and personal growth and addresses issues relevant to this generation, including leadership training, management skills and business/family relationships.
February2020
Tuesday
25
2020 Lansing Legislative Seminar
333 E. Michigan Ave.
Lansing, MI
Lansing Legislative Seminar provides an opportunity to learn from expert speakers on policy issues impacting agriculture, help legislative and regulatory leaders understand Farm Bureau policy, and share ideas and talk about local issues with fellow members.
March2020
Monday
9
2020 Washington Legislative Seminar
480 L'Enfant Plaza SW
Washington DC,
The 2020 Washington Legislative Seminar will update farmers on national issues and provide the opportunity to explore the Nation’s Capital. The seminar will provide opportunities for participants to make personal contact with members of Congress and other government leaders to advocate for legislation and/or regulation using Farm Bureau policy, which impacts Michigan agriculture.