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    Board members Christian and Matt with Buttercup at one of her many appearances

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Top Story

Katie Eisenberger

In the good ol’ days, after a long day’s work one would secure his or her horse to a hitching post outside a local establishment or a neighbor’s house before heading inside to catch up on the latest issues of the world.

We may have traded in our original horsepower for one with four wheels — and we can now communicate with one another without being in the same space — but one thing never goes out of style: learning something new. And we’ve got something new to share!

Over the next six months, members will have the opportunity to listen in as a group of Michigan Farm Bureau public policy specialists and industry professionals discuss critical agricultural topics through a virtual, laid-back atmosphere. They will look at current situations within the topic area, what related policy or programs MFB provides, and what next steps may look like.

Encourage someone you know to register if they’re interested in:

  • Gaining more awareness of current agriculture issues
  • Better understanding grassroots policy development
  • Getting perspective straight from the horse’s mouth!

To watch the Hitching Post, register for each monthly event separately. Attendees will have the opportunity to submit questions to the group. If you’re unable to join, but still interested in the content, all events will be recorded and posted to the MFB YouTube Channel.

Here’s the schedule of Hitching Post conversations, who’s moderating each discussion, and a link for participating:

I’m helping coordinate these discussions alongside my awesome coworker, Emily Reinart, the grassroots policy outreach specialist in MFB’s public policy division.

“This will be an opportunity for members to join a circle of peers for a short time commitment and invest in learning about current topics in the industry, how Michigan agriculture is impacted and how they can be involved in a solution,” Emily said.

All Hitching Post conversations will take place online via Cisco Webex, a convenient and easy-to-use online meeting platform that works on almost any desktop, laptop, tablet or smart phone with a decent internet connection. Farm Bureau members can download it by clicking here.

MFB staff contacts: Katie Eisenberger (517-679-5444) and Emily Reinhart (517-679-5337

 


Over the next six months, members will have the opportunity to listen in as a group of Michigan Farm Bureau public policy specialists and industry professionals discuss critical agricultural topics through a virtual, laid-back atmosphere.

County News

Katie Eisenberger

In the good ol’ days, after a long day’s work one would secure his or her horse to a hitching post outside a local establishment or a neighbor’s house before heading inside to catch up on the latest issues of the world.

We may have traded in our original horsepower for one with four wheels — and we can now communicate with one another without being in the same space — but one thing never goes out of style: learning something new. And we’ve got something new to share!

Over the next six months, members will have the opportunity to listen in as a group of Michigan Farm Bureau public policy specialists and industry professionals discuss critical agricultural topics through a virtual, laid-back atmosphere. They will look at current situations within the topic area, what related policy or programs MFB provides, and what next steps may look like.

Encourage someone you know to register if they’re interested in:

  • Gaining more awareness of current agriculture issues
  • Better understanding grassroots policy development
  • Getting perspective straight from the horse’s mouth!

To watch the Hitching Post, register for each monthly event separately. Attendees will have the opportunity to submit questions to the group. If you’re unable to join, but still interested in the content, all events will be recorded and posted to the MFB YouTube Channel.

Here’s the schedule of Hitching Post conversations, who’s moderating each discussion, and a link for participating:

I’m helping coordinate these discussions alongside my awesome coworker, Emily Reinart, the grassroots policy outreach specialist in MFB’s public policy division.

“This will be an opportunity for members to join a circle of peers for a short time commitment and invest in learning about current topics in the industry, how Michigan agriculture is impacted and how they can be involved in a solution,” Emily said.

All Hitching Post conversations will take place online via Cisco Webex, a convenient and easy-to-use online meeting platform that works on almost any desktop, laptop, tablet or smart phone with a decent internet connection. Farm Bureau members can download it by clicking here.

MFB staff contacts: Katie Eisenberger (517-679-5444) and Emily Reinhart (517-679-5337

 


Over the next six months, members will have the opportunity to listen in as a group of Michigan Farm Bureau public policy specialists and industry professionals discuss critical agricultural topics through a virtual, laid-back atmosphere.

Three MSU students honored with Michigan Farm Bureau scholarships

February 19, 2019

Three exemplary Michigan State University (MSU) students were honored Saturday, Feb.16, at Michigan Farm Bureau’s (MFB) Growing Together Conference in Grand Rapids.

Amanda Forraht of Berrien County, Elizabeth Ritchie of Van Buren County and Samantha Wagner of Jackson County were recipients of the MFB Marge Karker Scholarship.

Each received a $1,000 award to help fund her MSU education.

Amanda Forraht

Amanda is majoring in animal science in MSU’s College of Agriculture and Natural Resources (CANR). Raised on her family’s farm, she learned the value of caring for animals and the land influencing her decision to pursue a career in the equine industry. Upon graduation, Amanda hopes to work in equine physical therapy or rehabilitation to keep performance horses in top condition for their sport.

At MSU, Amanda participates in the Rodeo Club and Dairy Evaluation Judging Team. Outside of the university, she’s been involved in the Ranch Horse Association of Michigan, Mid-America Cowgirls Rodeo Drill Team and 4-H.

Amanda is the daughter of Douglas and Suzanne Forraht of Sodus.

Elizabeth Ritchie

Elizabeth is a second-year student in MSU’s College of Veterinary Medicine. After helping nurse an ill calf back to health as a child, Elizabeth developed a passion for the health and welfare of livestock. Through internships during her vet school tenure, she’s found a niche in veterinary pharmaceutical development. Whether working in private practice or for a veterinary pharmaceutical company, Elizabeth hopes to use her advanced degree to further improve the health of livestock.

Elizabeth holds a Bachelor of Science degree from Grand Valley State University. She is actively involved in many student organizations within the College of Veterinary Medicine, including serving as the secretary of the Food Animal Club. Elizabeth credits 4-H for her exposure to multiple livestock species.

Elizabeth is the daughter of Tim and Stacy Ritchie of Decatur.

Samantha Wagner

Samantha is a senior majoring in Agriculture, Food and Natural Resources Education in MSU’s CANR. As a member of the Springport FFA Chapter, Samantha gained exposure to agricultural education in high school influencing her decision to pursue a career as an agricultural educator. At MSU, Samantha has been a Glassen Scholar working on behalf of MSU with the Department of Natural Resources’ Legislative and Legal Affairs Office.

Samantha is an active member of student organizations on campus including the Sigma Alpha Sorority, Block and Bridle, and Agriculture Future of America.

She is the daughter of Dale and Lou Wagner of Springport.

Michigan Farm Bureau’s Marge Karker Scholarship was established in the 1960s to honor the former coordinator of Farm Bureau women’s programs which included activities involving citizenship, health, education, legislation, public relations, safety and community projects. Through her tenure from 1922-1964, Marge Karker helped to lay the foundation for the current Promotion and Education and Young Farmer programming. The scholarship is open to any MSU student of sophomore standing or higher who is studying in the CANR, College of Veterinary Medicine or Institute of Agricultural Technology.

The next round of applications will be due Oct. 1, 2019.

 

MSU Students

Legislators to hear from members at Lansing Legislative Seminar

February 19, 2019

Members attending this year’s Michigan Farm Bureau (MFB) Lansing Legislative Seminar on Feb. 26 will help celebrate the organization’s centennial anniversary, reflecting on 100 years of grass-roots policy implementation and growth of the agriculture sector through legislative and regulatory initiatives. At the same time, nearly 400 attendees will hear from a variety of speakers, setting the tone for the year as MFB acclimates and builds relationships with the Whitmer administration and new leaders in the Legislature and regulatory agencies.  

“We’re fortunate to welcome to the event Michigan Department of Agriculture and Rural Development Deputy Director Dr. James Averill, Department of Natural Resources Director Dan Eichinger and Department of Environmental Quality Deputy Director Aaron Keatley,” said MFB Communications Specialist Nicole Sevrey, the event’s coordinator. “Through a town hall-style format, the panel of three will field questions from the audience — not only will the discussion help members learn more about the departments’ respective priorities, but also help the department leaders understand our members’ expectations and areas of potential growth or concern.”

The program will also recognize Ogemaw County Farm Bureau will receive the with the Excellence in Grass-roots Lobbying Award for their efforts to protect the integrity of the Right to Farm (RTF) Act. In 2018, the Edwards Township Planning Commission attempted to thwart a livestock operation from expansion.

“Ogemaw County Farm Bureau President Brent Illig, who is also a trustee on the commission, recruited  70 farmers to attend the commission meeting in support of the Right to Farm,” said MFB Government Relations Specialist Matt Kapp. “As a result of the local Farm Bureau’s work, the commission unanimously defeated the proposal.”

Guests will also hear from Silver Plow Award recipients including former Sen. Tom Casperson, Sen. Dan Lauwers and Rep. Aaron Miller. The trio played a critical role in three initiatives impacting all aspects of Michigan agriculture: creating three Department of Environmental Quality oversight boards; amendments to agriculture’s sales and use tax exemptions; and improvements to the state’s large-quantity water-withdrawal program. The Silver Plow is MFB’s top recognition for a member of the Legislature or Congress, signifying farmers’ appreciation for leadership and support consistent with the organization’s member-developed policy.

Before ending their day at the legislative reception where they’ll visit with state representatives, senators and numerous other government officials, members can participate in four educational sessions: 

  • Farming as a Good Neighbor – Presenters will discuss the Right to Farm Act and its application of science to protect farmers from nuisance claims. Attendees will also hear about the agriculture sector’s focus on water quality by utilizing proactive, voluntary conservation programs. 
  • State Funding Priorities and Economic Outlook – In this session members will gain an understanding of economic forecasts in relation to the state agriculture department and research funding priorities within MSU.
  • Infrastructure: Roads, Bridges, Energy, Broadband and Beyond – Attendees will receive an overview of the current state of Michigan’s infrastructure and potential new policy initiatives. 
  • Legislators Are Consumers Too – This session will provide attendees with information and resources to build and nurture relationships with new legislators by listening, asking questions, identifying common values, and discussing and relating with them on issues.

 

State News

By Audrey Sebolt


Most agritourism ventures in Michigan lean hard toward the autumnal.



Michigan produces more than 300 different agricultural commodities. Add breathtaking views from hilly apple orchards and wide open spaces for corn mazes and Christmas tree farms and it’s no small wonder Michigan is home to a thriving — and growing — agritourism sector.

As the intersection of agriculture and tourism, agritourism allows for the public to connect with agriculture, experience farm life and taste its bounty. Activities can encompass everything from picking produce like strawberries, apples and blueberries to experiencing exciting adventures such as corn mazes, pumpkin catapulting and wagon rides. Agritourism allows families to celebrate events such on-farm weddings and holidays by choosing and picking your favorite pumpkin and Christmas tree.

The agritourism industry relies heavily on good weather weekends for visitors to enjoy. For the agritourism business, weather that keeps family and friends at home means lost revenue.

This summer, Michigan experienced its busiest summer on record due to COVID-19 restrictions and the cancellation of most other activities. The busy summer meant most strawberry operations had to close their doors, after being open for only a few hours, because all of the available ripe berries were picked before noon.

I myself visited a small operation where the owner had to close the gates 45 minutes after it opened. Compare that to last year when I picked berries at another operation and saw late-season berries rotting on the vine. When I asked the owners why, they said they’d had two very rainy weekends back-to-back, so visitors didn’t come to pick and a tremendous amount of revenue was lost.

Michigan’s agritourism operations invested a tremendous amount of time this year preparing to open their doors to the public while implementing COVID-19 precautions to ensure their customers’ safety.

U-pick strawberry patches offered new containers for customers and asked them to keep last year’s container at home. Many large u-pick apple operations offered the ability to reserve time slots online so crowds could be managed and adequate staffing was ensured. One large operation hired staff specifically to safely sanitize high-touch areas.

Despite such successes, Michigan agritourism felt two huge gaping holes this year.

The first was on-farm weddings that were cancelled due to crowd restrictions, meaning thousands in lost revenue. The second were cancelled field trips — a lost season of educating young people about the significance of Michigan agriculture.

The last agritourism segment to open its doors this year will be the choose-n-cut Christmas tree farms. Thanksgiving falls late on the calendar this year — Nov. 26 — so there are only four weekends between it and Christmas! Christmas tree farms are expecting an extremely busy 2020 season, managing a lot of customers in a short period of time.

And unlike other agritourism segments, Christmas tree customers rarely stay home because of the weather!

Questions 

  1. Discuss the state of agritourism in your county and region. How has it changed (presumably grown) in recent decades?
  2. How well (accurately) do agritourism ventures in your area depict the realities of food commodity production?
  3. With the exception of summertime berry picking, Michigan’s most common agritourism ventures are primarily autumnal: apples, pumpkins then Christmas trees as winter approaches. What opportunities might be feasible for expanded agritourism activities in the winter and spring.

AND/OR submit one of the following to [email protected]:

  • Suggest a CAG discussion topic your group is dying to chew on.
  • Describe a local issue impacting farmers in your area that nobody seems to be talking about.

How to Respond (Please include your name & CAG affiliation.)

  • Email: [email protected]
  • Conventional, postal mail: MFB Community Group Discussion, ATTN: Michelle Joseph, 7373 W. Saginaw Hwy., Lansing, MI 48909
Michigan’s agritourism operations invested a tremendous amount of time this year preparing to open their doors to the public while implementing COVID-19 precautions to ensure their customers’ safety.

As of Nov. 20, Michigan is at less than 50% of its deer TB testing quota required in a USDA/MDARD agreement. Failure to meet the testing quota could prompt USDA to reevaluate Michigan’s TB status, leading to additional testing requirements statewide of the state’s beef and dairy herds. (Photo, MDNR) 

Deer hunters in a dozen northern Lower Peninsula counties are urged to turn in the heads of harvested deer to an MDNR check station or drop box for bovine tuberculosis testing this hunting season. If testing quotas aren’t met by year’s end, the USDA could reevaluate the entire state’s TB status, imperiling Michigan’s beef and dairy farmers. 

“The new memorandum of understanding between USDA and Michigan requires a significant number of deer heads to be turned in for TB testing in the Modified Accredited Zone and surrounding counties,” said Ernie Birchmeier, MFB’s dairy and livestock specialist. “It is imperative that we all collaborate to achieve those goals.

“Failure to meet the requirements could cause USDA to reevaluate the TB status of the entire state of Michigan. Lowering the state’s status could lead to additional testing requirements statewide, which would be a significant challenge for our beef and dairy farmers.”

While more than 2,000 animals across the Northeastern region of the state had been tested as of Nov. 20 (current numbers are available online), it's significantly under the MOU testing requirements.

Per the MOU, signed this past February, MDNR is required to conduct active surveillance for bovine TB in free-ranging white-tailed deer. Michigan’s Modified Accredited Zone (MAZ), which includes Alcona, Alpena, Montmorency and Oscoda counties, is required to test 2,800 deer annually. 

As of Nov. 20, only 1,220 deer — just 43.6% of the number required — had been tested collectively in the MAZ.

New annual testing quotas are also required for the seven counties surrounding the MAZ including 500 free-ranging deer in Presque Isle County, and 300 each in Cheboygan, Crawford, Iosco, Ogemaw, Otsego and Roscommon for a combined total of 2,300 deer. 

Thus far only 798 deer had been tested in those counties — less than 35% of the number required in the USDA/MDARD agreement.

“It’s imperative we hit those testing quota numbers,” Birchmeier said. “Harvesting a large number of deer and getting the heads tested for TB can help reduce the overall population in areas that have a significant number of deer and we can help to prove to USDA that we are containing the disease and working to eliminate it.”

“Sixty percent of deer that test positive show no signs of the disease, so testing is important,” said Emily Sewell, DNR wildlife health specialist. “It’s important that hunters take precautions like wearing latex or rubber gloves when field dressing. If they notice any lesions on the lungs or in the chest cavity, they should avoid cutting into the lesions and bring the deer to a check station.” 

Check station and drop box locations are listed below and online at Michigan.gov/DeerCheck

For more information visit Michigan.gov/BovineTB or contact Sewell or Birchmeier directly.

DNR Drop Box Locations

  • Alanson — Oden Hatchery Visitor Center; 24-hour drop box; 3377 Oden Road, Alanson; 989-732-3541 ext. 5031
  • Alpena Field Office — check station, 24-hour drop box; 4343 M-32 West, Alpena; 989-785-4251 ext. 5233
  • Atlanta Field Office — check Station, 24-hour drop box; 13501 M-33, Atlanta; 989-785-4251 ext. 5233
  • Cheboygan Field Office — 24-hour drop box120 A Street, Cheboygan; 989-732-3541 ext. 5031
  • Curran BP Gas Station — check station; M-65 & M-72, Curran; 989-348-6371 ext. 7477
  • East Tawas State Harbor Dock — check station; 113 Newman St., Hwy. US-23, East Tawas; 989-275-5151 ext. 2039
  • Gaylord Customer Service Center — check station, 24-hour drop box; 1732 West M-32, Gaylord; 989-732-3541
  • Grayling Field Office — check station, 24-hour drop box; 1955 Hartwick Pines Road, Grayling; 989-348-6371 ext. 7477
  • Hale — Alward’s Market, 118 S. Washington St., Hale; 989-728-2315
  • Hillman BP Gas Station — 24-hour drop box; 27400 M-32 West, Hillman; 989-785-4251 ext. 5233
  • Indian River Field Office — 24-hour drop box; 6984 Wilson Road, Indian River; 989-732-3541 ext. 5031
  • Lincoln Field Office — check station; 408 Main Street, Lincoln; 989-736-8336
  • Lupton — Rifle River Recreation Area; check station; 2550 E. Rose City Road, Lupton; 989-473-2258
  • Mio DNR Field Office — check station, 24-hour drop box; 191 S. Mt. Tom Road, Mio; 989-275-5151 ext. 2722030
  • Onaway Check Station — Tom’s IGA, 20597 State St., Onaway; 989-785-4251 ext. 5233
  • Posen Check Station — behind Huron Oil Co., 10941 Michigan Ave., Posen; 989-785-4251 ext. 5233
  • Rogers City — Adrian’s Sport Shop; 24-hour drop box; 335 N. Bradley Hwy., Rogers City,
     989-785-4251 ext. 5233
  • Roscommon Customer Service Center — check station, 24-hour drop box; 8717 N. Roscommon Road, Roscommon; 989-275-5151 ext. 2722039
  • West Branch Field Office — check station; 410 N. Fairview Road, West Branch; 989-345-0472

Related Stories:

State updates bovine TB quotas for 7 counties

Another Alpena County beef herd confirmed TB positive

Deer check and CWD, TB testing changes for 2020 hunting season

 
Deer hunters in a dozen northern Lower Peninsula counties are urged to turn in the heads of harvested deer to an MDNR check station or drop box for bovine tuberculosis testing this hunting season. If testing quotas aren’t met by year’s end, the USDA



Top - Map of District Meeting Dates Bottom - MFB Board Member Mike Fusilier presents Washtenaw County member Katelyn Packard with the 2020 Young Farmer Ag Leader Award at the Dist. 3 policy meeting Nov. 11.


District policy meetings got underway Nov. 9 as county Farm Bureau delegates statewide met for regional discussions about new and amended policy recommendations on the docket for Michigan Farm Bureau’s hybrid-virtual 2020 State Annual Meeting, Dec. 2. Regional meetings took place in 10 out of 12 Farm Bureau districts across both peninsulas.

District 10 

In the northeastern Lower Peninsula, District 10 was first out of the gates, meeting in the morning of Nov. 9.

Leona Daniels was reelected district director and we had good discussion,” reports Northeastern Regional Manager Sonya Novotny. “I believe we’ll have some amendments come through from our district and they are working on those before the November deadline.

Eldon Barclay, our state PD representative, did a wonderful job presenting policy and leading the policy discussion.”

District 1

In the opposite corner of the Lower Peninsula, District 1 met that same evening with 50 members gathered for food, fellowship, recognition and policy discussion.

“The event went very well,” reported Southwest Regional Manager Sarah Pion. “State Farm Bureau leaders Brigette LeachJulie Stephenson and Mitch Kline all did a great job at presenting our county members with their awards and recognition.”

On the recognition agenda were MFB Educator of the Year Steve Rigoni and state Young Farmer Employee Award winner Tera Baker, as well as State Young Farmer Award finalists Riley Brazo and Andy Heinitz.

“State Policy Development Committee members Cliff Lipscomb and Melissa Morlock were very effective at presenting this year’s proposed policy resolutions and walking through the issue ideas with our delegates and facilitating the policy discussion.”

Delegates in the southwest discussed the ongoing meat processing and packing issue, as well as bovine tuberculosis and state road funding.

District 5

District 5 delegates met in Owosso Nov. 10.

“It was nice to get out of the house, see other Farm Bureau members and talk about current issues, said Ingham County member Don Vickers.

Central Regional Manager Hannah Lange said District 5 delegates also welcomed a special guest, MFB President Carl Bednarski, who dropped in to share his thoughts on the importance of continuing business through a crisis.

District 3

District 3 met in Howell Nov. 11 to start working through its policy agenda and recognize state-level Young Farmer Ag Leader Award winner, Washtenaw County member Katelyn Packard.

Delegates from across the southeast confabbed on a wide range of policy matters: utility wire placement, urban and legislative outreach, the Michigan Ag Council Ag Ambassador program, mandatory vaccinations and the tax implications for pandemic-forced home-schooling.

District 7

Farm Bureau members from across District 7 convened Nov. 11 in Reed City.

“We have a great group of both new and experienced members,” said West-Central Regional Manager Bridget Moore. “Everyone had great attitudes and were excited to still be able to come together and focus on policy.

“The motto of the night was ‘making lemonade out of lemons.’ Our members did a great job of that and are looking forward to live discussion on Dec 2.”

District 9

Northwestern Regional Manager Nicole Jennings reports District 9’s Nov. 11 meeting in Cadillac saw exceptional engagement from several first-time delegates just getting their policy-development sea legs.

“For our first-timers, much of this process was very new,” Jennings said, “but our state-annual veterans stepped into their leadership roles to help the newer attendees understand and take part in this process.

“Even as we faced the challenges of 2020, member involvement in the policy development process has remained strong. Thorough discussion led by the members and for the members, as it has been and should be.”

~

Farm Bureau members also met last week in Districts 6, 8, 11 and 12. Regional meetings wrap up Nov. 19, with sessions that day in Districts 2 and 4.

District policy meetings got underway Nov. 9 as county Farm Bureau delegates statewide met for regional discussions about new and amended policy recommendations on the docket for Michigan Farm Bureau’s hybrid-virtual 2020 State Annual Meeting, Dec. 2

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