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Top Story

Three MSU students honored with Michigan Farm Bureau scholarships

February 19, 2019

Three exemplary Michigan State University (MSU) students were honored Saturday, Feb.16, at Michigan Farm Bureau’s (MFB) Growing Together Conference in Grand Rapids.

Amanda Forraht of Berrien County, Elizabeth Ritchie of Van Buren County and Samantha Wagner of Jackson County were recipients of the MFB Marge Karker Scholarship.

Each received a $1,000 award to help fund her MSU education.

Amanda Forraht

Amanda is majoring in animal science in MSU’s College of Agriculture and Natural Resources (CANR). Raised on her family’s farm, she learned the value of caring for animals and the land influencing her decision to pursue a career in the equine industry. Upon graduation, Amanda hopes to work in equine physical therapy or rehabilitation to keep performance horses in top condition for their sport.

At MSU, Amanda participates in the Rodeo Club and Dairy Evaluation Judging Team. Outside of the university, she’s been involved in the Ranch Horse Association of Michigan, Mid-America Cowgirls Rodeo Drill Team and 4-H.

Amanda is the daughter of Douglas and Suzanne Forraht of Sodus.

Elizabeth Ritchie

Elizabeth is a second-year student in MSU’s College of Veterinary Medicine. After helping nurse an ill calf back to health as a child, Elizabeth developed a passion for the health and welfare of livestock. Through internships during her vet school tenure, she’s found a niche in veterinary pharmaceutical development. Whether working in private practice or for a veterinary pharmaceutical company, Elizabeth hopes to use her advanced degree to further improve the health of livestock.

Elizabeth holds a Bachelor of Science degree from Grand Valley State University. She is actively involved in many student organizations within the College of Veterinary Medicine, including serving as the secretary of the Food Animal Club. Elizabeth credits 4-H for her exposure to multiple livestock species.

Elizabeth is the daughter of Tim and Stacy Ritchie of Decatur.

Samantha Wagner

Samantha is a senior majoring in Agriculture, Food and Natural Resources Education in MSU’s CANR. As a member of the Springport FFA Chapter, Samantha gained exposure to agricultural education in high school influencing her decision to pursue a career as an agricultural educator. At MSU, Samantha has been a Glassen Scholar working on behalf of MSU with the Department of Natural Resources’ Legislative and Legal Affairs Office.

Samantha is an active member of student organizations on campus including the Sigma Alpha Sorority, Block and Bridle, and Agriculture Future of America.

She is the daughter of Dale and Lou Wagner of Springport.

Michigan Farm Bureau’s Marge Karker Scholarship was established in the 1960s to honor the former coordinator of Farm Bureau women’s programs which included activities involving citizenship, health, education, legislation, public relations, safety and community projects. Through her tenure from 1922-1964, Marge Karker helped to lay the foundation for the current Promotion and Education and Young Farmer programming. The scholarship is open to any MSU student of sophomore standing or higher who is studying in the CANR, College of Veterinary Medicine or Institute of Agricultural Technology.

The next round of applications will be due Oct. 1, 2019.

 

MSU Students

County News

Three MSU students honored with Michigan Farm Bureau scholarships

February 19, 2019

Three exemplary Michigan State University (MSU) students were honored Saturday, Feb.16, at Michigan Farm Bureau’s (MFB) Growing Together Conference in Grand Rapids.

Amanda Forraht of Berrien County, Elizabeth Ritchie of Van Buren County and Samantha Wagner of Jackson County were recipients of the MFB Marge Karker Scholarship.

Each received a $1,000 award to help fund her MSU education.

Amanda Forraht

Amanda is majoring in animal science in MSU’s College of Agriculture and Natural Resources (CANR). Raised on her family’s farm, she learned the value of caring for animals and the land influencing her decision to pursue a career in the equine industry. Upon graduation, Amanda hopes to work in equine physical therapy or rehabilitation to keep performance horses in top condition for their sport.

At MSU, Amanda participates in the Rodeo Club and Dairy Evaluation Judging Team. Outside of the university, she’s been involved in the Ranch Horse Association of Michigan, Mid-America Cowgirls Rodeo Drill Team and 4-H.

Amanda is the daughter of Douglas and Suzanne Forraht of Sodus.

Elizabeth Ritchie

Elizabeth is a second-year student in MSU’s College of Veterinary Medicine. After helping nurse an ill calf back to health as a child, Elizabeth developed a passion for the health and welfare of livestock. Through internships during her vet school tenure, she’s found a niche in veterinary pharmaceutical development. Whether working in private practice or for a veterinary pharmaceutical company, Elizabeth hopes to use her advanced degree to further improve the health of livestock.

Elizabeth holds a Bachelor of Science degree from Grand Valley State University. She is actively involved in many student organizations within the College of Veterinary Medicine, including serving as the secretary of the Food Animal Club. Elizabeth credits 4-H for her exposure to multiple livestock species.

Elizabeth is the daughter of Tim and Stacy Ritchie of Decatur.

Samantha Wagner

Samantha is a senior majoring in Agriculture, Food and Natural Resources Education in MSU’s CANR. As a member of the Springport FFA Chapter, Samantha gained exposure to agricultural education in high school influencing her decision to pursue a career as an agricultural educator. At MSU, Samantha has been a Glassen Scholar working on behalf of MSU with the Department of Natural Resources’ Legislative and Legal Affairs Office.

Samantha is an active member of student organizations on campus including the Sigma Alpha Sorority, Block and Bridle, and Agriculture Future of America.

She is the daughter of Dale and Lou Wagner of Springport.

Michigan Farm Bureau’s Marge Karker Scholarship was established in the 1960s to honor the former coordinator of Farm Bureau women’s programs which included activities involving citizenship, health, education, legislation, public relations, safety and community projects. Through her tenure from 1922-1964, Marge Karker helped to lay the foundation for the current Promotion and Education and Young Farmer programming. The scholarship is open to any MSU student of sophomore standing or higher who is studying in the CANR, College of Veterinary Medicine or Institute of Agricultural Technology.

The next round of applications will be due Oct. 1, 2019.

 

MSU Students

Legislators to hear from members at Lansing Legislative Seminar

February 19, 2019

Members attending this year’s Michigan Farm Bureau (MFB) Lansing Legislative Seminar on Feb. 26 will help celebrate the organization’s centennial anniversary, reflecting on 100 years of grass-roots policy implementation and growth of the agriculture sector through legislative and regulatory initiatives. At the same time, nearly 400 attendees will hear from a variety of speakers, setting the tone for the year as MFB acclimates and builds relationships with the Whitmer administration and new leaders in the Legislature and regulatory agencies.  

“We’re fortunate to welcome to the event Michigan Department of Agriculture and Rural Development Deputy Director Dr. James Averill, Department of Natural Resources Director Dan Eichinger and Department of Environmental Quality Deputy Director Aaron Keatley,” said MFB Communications Specialist Nicole Sevrey, the event’s coordinator. “Through a town hall-style format, the panel of three will field questions from the audience — not only will the discussion help members learn more about the departments’ respective priorities, but also help the department leaders understand our members’ expectations and areas of potential growth or concern.”

The program will also recognize Ogemaw County Farm Bureau will receive the with the Excellence in Grass-roots Lobbying Award for their efforts to protect the integrity of the Right to Farm (RTF) Act. In 2018, the Edwards Township Planning Commission attempted to thwart a livestock operation from expansion.

“Ogemaw County Farm Bureau President Brent Illig, who is also a trustee on the commission, recruited  70 farmers to attend the commission meeting in support of the Right to Farm,” said MFB Government Relations Specialist Matt Kapp. “As a result of the local Farm Bureau’s work, the commission unanimously defeated the proposal.”

Guests will also hear from Silver Plow Award recipients including former Sen. Tom Casperson, Sen. Dan Lauwers and Rep. Aaron Miller. The trio played a critical role in three initiatives impacting all aspects of Michigan agriculture: creating three Department of Environmental Quality oversight boards; amendments to agriculture’s sales and use tax exemptions; and improvements to the state’s large-quantity water-withdrawal program. The Silver Plow is MFB’s top recognition for a member of the Legislature or Congress, signifying farmers’ appreciation for leadership and support consistent with the organization’s member-developed policy.

Before ending their day at the legislative reception where they’ll visit with state representatives, senators and numerous other government officials, members can participate in four educational sessions: 

  • Farming as a Good Neighbor – Presenters will discuss the Right to Farm Act and its application of science to protect farmers from nuisance claims. Attendees will also hear about the agriculture sector’s focus on water quality by utilizing proactive, voluntary conservation programs. 
  • State Funding Priorities and Economic Outlook – In this session members will gain an understanding of economic forecasts in relation to the state agriculture department and research funding priorities within MSU.
  • Infrastructure: Roads, Bridges, Energy, Broadband and Beyond – Attendees will receive an overview of the current state of Michigan’s infrastructure and potential new policy initiatives. 
  • Legislators Are Consumers Too – This session will provide attendees with information and resources to build and nurture relationships with new legislators by listening, asking questions, identifying common values, and discussing and relating with them on issues.

 

State News

Michigan Farm Bureau
The 2020 ProFILE class

From a group of young Michigan professionals feeling the first warm rays of spring on their face after a long, cold winter, the upbeat chatter is to be expected. Ahead of them lies one mile of rolling Pennsylvania farmland, a late-afternoon walk in air that’s fresh and over ground popping with the season’s first shoots of green.

At the command of instructor Joe Mieczkowski, the march commences. It’s a walk that takes roughly 30 minutes at a leisurely pace. Mieczkowski pauses along the way:

“2,500 left at this point.”

“1,000 left.”

“500 left.”

“250 left.”

The laughter and conversation wane as the distance between the group and the stone wall is reduced. And understandably so. While this land is now covered in crops, somewhere below the surface is the blood of thousands.

This Pennsylvania field is the spot of the culminating assault known (incorrectly) as Pickett’s Charge. It is here that some 12,000 Confederate soldiers walked headlong into a hail of Union bullets, artillery fire and munitions. When the Michigan Farm Bureau ProFILE class finished its march across that revenant ground, it stood at a point where history tells us roughly just 100 of the 12,000 made it to. It was a spectacular and decisive failure, fueled in large part by a likely lapse in leadership and decision-making.

“If there is a better place to study the impact leadership can have than here on the Gettysburg battlefields, I’ve yet to see it,” said Mieczkowski. “In your careers, you will stand where Gen. Lee stood, where Pickett stood, where Longstreet stood. The question is this: How will you lead your troops?”

ProFILE is Michigan Farm Bureau’s Institute for Leadership Education, a leadership experience for MFB members ages 25-35. The 15-month intensive is designed to provide participants with opportunities and experiences to help them grow personally and professionally.

Prior to the Washington Legislative Seminar, the 2020 ProFILE class of 15 students spent two days in Gettysburg, learning about leadership styles, techniques and tactics as part of the Lincoln Leadership Institute at Gettysburg.

The full-day course included classroom instruction at the historic David Wills House, where Pres. Lincoln stayed and prepared the Gettysburg address. The classroom instruction was then put to practical, real-world use on location where critical moments of leadership and decision-making took place during the battle at Gettysburg. From Union Col. Chamberlain’s inspirational defense of the unit’s flank on Little Round Top to Gen. Robert E. Lee’s fateful decision to attack the center of the Union line at Cemetery Ridge.

“Being in Gettysburg and seeing where the battle took place, thinking about how the decisions were made really was amazing,” said Casey Bozung of Kalamazoo County. “It’s something I’ll take back to my personal and professional life and will think about how I can be a better transactional and transformational leader.”

The Lincoln Leadership Institute is nationally renowned for its curriculum and has trained leaders from some of the country’s largest companies and brands. That reputation, according to the ProFILE participants, was well-earned.

“It was really an amazing experience,” said Matt Marston of Livingston County. “The hands-on experience and seeing exactly how the decisions and actions of those leaders changed history was awesome.”

The Gettysburg visit is just one facet of the 15-month ProFILE course. The group already participated in sessions on public speaking and, in September, will convene in St. Johns for media training.

“Our goal is to challenge the participants. We see this as an opportunity for their organization, Michigan Farm Bureau, to invest in them as a leader,” said Emily Reinart, Grassroots Policy

From a group of young Michigan professionals feeling the first warm rays of spring on their face after a long, cold winter, the upbeat chatter is to be expected.
Katie Eisenberger

Nine FFA chapters were honored at the Michigan FFA Convention for working ag-literacy efforts in their communities 

The Michigan Foundation for Agriculture’s #SpeakAgMichigan award honored nine FFA chapters with a total of $5,000 during the Michigan FFA Convention, March 4 at Michigan State University. Recognized chapters are working to help their community become more agriculturally literate, giving them a basic understanding of raising plants and animals for food, fuel and fiber.

Gold Chapters IthacaMontague and North Huron each received $800.

Receiving $500 as silver chapters were CaledoniaRavennaSt. Louis and Springport.

Bronze chapters receiving $300 were Breckenridge and Webberville.

Collectively, award recipients taught agriculture-based lessons to more than 6,000 students in their local school districts. These high school FFA members set goals, communicated with elementary teachers, planned and delivered grade-appropriate lessons or educational stations to show the many ways agriculture products are present in daily life. In addition, these award recipients organized agriculture and natural resources educational programming for more than 5,000 adults. Many partnered with their county Farm Bureaus to enhance programming for both organizations.

The Michigan Foundation for Agriculture’s mission is to communicate agriculture’s message to consumers and students through educational programming and to provide leadership development for agriculturalists of today and tomorrow. This award does just that. Inspired by National FFA’s similar initiative, the #SpeakAgMichigan award is more than just a social media trend, it can be a language used to close the gap between agriculture and consumers.

“The #SpeakAgMichigan Awards supports two of Michigan Farm Bureau’s top priorities: leadership development and consumer outreach. We are encouraged by, and are proud to recognize, the efforts of young agriculture leaders to bridge the communication gap between farmers and our consumers,” said Alex Schnabelrauch, director of the Michigan Foundation for Agriculture. “These FFA students are making a real difference in their schools and communities, and we look forward to connecting them with leadership and outreach opportunities long after graduation.”

Chapters receiving #SpeakAgMichigan award received a monetary contribution to further their agricultural literacy outreach efforts. Individual chapter efforts will be highlighted through out the fall of 2020 when the online application opens Sept. 1. Applications are due Dec. 1.

The Michigan Foundation for Agriculture, a 501(c)(3) governed by Michigan Farm Bureau’s Board of Directors, positively contributes to the future of Michigan agriculture through leadership and educational programming. The Michigan FFA Association is dedicated to making a positive difference in the lives of young people by developing their potential for premier leadership, personal growth and career success through agricultural education.

For more information, contact MFB Education High School & Collegiate Programs Specialist Katie Eisenberger at 517-679-5444.

The Michigan Foundation for Agriculture’s #SpeakAgMichigan award honored nine FFA chapters with a total of $5,000 during the Michigan FFA Convention, March 4 at Michigan State University.
Michigan Farm Bureau

Farm Bureau Insurance Managing Partner and Agent Charitable Fund Committee Member Nick Hurst sorting fresh fruit at the Food Bank of Eastern Michigan in Flint 2019

LANSING – To help Michigan consumers bridge the food gap during the state’s ongoing COVID challenge, the Michigan Farm Bureau Family of Companies — Farm Bureau Insurance of Michigan, Michigan Farm Bureau and the Agent Charitable Fund — have announced the launch of a statewide fundraiser, the “Million Meal Challenge.”

The Agent Charitable Fund and Farm Bureau Insurance of Michigan will donate $50,000 during the Million Meal Challenge and will match up to $50,000 in additional donations from members, clients and supporters.

With every dollar raised equating to six meals, the goal is to collectively donate a million meals to the seven regional food banks in Michigan, benefitting all 83 counties. 

In announcing the Million Meal Challenge, Don Simon, CEO, Farm Bureau Insurance of Michigan, said efforts to minimize exposure of COVID-19 through Michigan’s “Stay Home, Stay Safe” Executive Order (EO 2020-21) closing schools, restaurants and other establishments deemed non-essential, has left many families struggling to make ends meet. 

“Right now, it is more important than ever for our state to come together,” Simon said. “As we all face this pandemic, helping to provide Michigan children and families with healthy meals during this trying time is a great way for us to do just that. The entire Farm Bureau family is proud to sponsor this challenge so that together, with our partners and community members, we can provide one million meals.”

The fundraiser will engage every person who is part of the Michigan Farm Bureau family – agents, members, staff and insureds – to come together and support each other through uncertain times, according to Merrick Maris, Farm Bureau Insurance agent and Agent Charitable Fund Committee chair. 

“The Agent Charitable Fund was created to help people in need,” Maris said. “Our agents came together and created this fund in 2018 because we wanted to support the greater Michigan community, specifically children. This challenge allows us to ensure our kids and families who are in need are provided for during this time of crisis.” 

The Agent Charitable Fund, whose mission is to end hunger in Michigan, is a donor-designated fund administered through the Michigan Foundation for Agriculture. The Michigan Foundation for Agriculture, a 501(c)(3) governed by Michigan Farm Bureaus board of directors, positively contributes to the future of Michigan agriculture through leadership and educational programming.

Through grant programs and donations, Farm Bureau agents, clients and partners provide food and educational programs to Michigan residents struggling with hunger and aid the more than 3,000 hunger-relief agencies throughout the state. To donate toward the Million Meal Challenge, visit https://www.justgiving.com/campaign/millionmeals.

Michigan Farm Bureau and Michigan Farm News are committed to providing its members and readers with the latest news and information on the COVID-19 pandemic. For news, updates and resources, visit https://www.michfb.com/MI/Coronavirus/. The page will be updated daily as more information becomes available.

The Agent Charitable Fund and Farm Bureau Insurance of Michigan will donate $50,000 during the Million Meal Challenge and will match up to $50,000 in additional donations from members, clients and supporters.

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